Commission Blueprint Review – Is This Clickbank Formula a Scam?

Does the Commission Blueprint system really work, or is it another overhyped and useless affiliate marketing product? I was really skeptical about this product at first, because I have fallen for many make money online scams before and did not want to become another victim. However, after hearing many success stories from people who have tried it, I went ahead to try this myself.

1. Who Are The Creators of Commission Blueprint?

This product is created by Tim Godfrey and Steven Clayton, both successful affiliate marketers today. Tim has been building websites for over 5 years now, and his websites have generated more than $25 million dollars for him. He specializes in marketing to the gambling industry, but his methods have been proven to work across other niches too.

Steven is another marketer who employs another strategy but has enjoyed as much success in affiliate marketing. He specializes in using AdWords traffic and has an internet marketing campaign of his own. Together, these 2 men have produced what I feel is one of the fastest course to start making money with affiliate marketing on the internet.

2. What Will You Get In The Commission Blueprint Package?

This system is meant to produce income on almost autopilot by using Clickbank and AdWords. In the video series in this package, you will learn step by step how to start from selecting products to driving traffic and finally converting the visitor into a paying customer. Along with the videos are written guides, templates and mind maps provided making learning the system really easy, especially for beginners.

Once you have understood the system, you will find the page templates provided to be very useful. They have been very well optimized to convert traffic, and I have been pleased to see how well they perform when I send AdWords traffic to them.

Real Estate Commission – A Corrupting Influence

Real estate commission is the way in which real estate agents are paid for the services they provide. They receive a percentage of the price received for the property. Effectively, the real estate agent requires the seller of a property (the vendor) to sign over to the real estate agent a part of the property being sold.

Another way of looking at it is to say that the real estate agent, through the wording of the listing contract, effectively has his name added to the title deed of the vendor’s property, so that the real estate agent becomes a part-owner of the property. When the property sells, the real estate agent receives a payment that represents his share in the vendor’s property.

Most readers will be aware of the arguments in favour of real estate sale commissions, so I won’t discuss those here. My focus is on the ways in which the sale process can be skewed against all parties involved, when the motivation to win a commission takes precedence over more important considerations.

Commission is a “winner-takes-all, loser gets nothing” situation. This increases the pressure on the real estate agent to secure a sale. Time is also a problem. If the real estate agent cannot secure a sale within a time acceptable to the vendor, the vendor may take the property off the market, or away from the real estate agent’s agency. This will result in a total loss for the real estate agent.

Finally, the vendor becomes an obstacle between the real estate agent and his commission goal. In order to receive payment for his share of the vendor’s property, the real estate agent must receive an offer to purchase within the available time, but the offer must be accepted by the vendor. If the vendor decides that the offer is not acceptable, then the real estate agent loses.

In order to win the gambling game that is real estate sales, the real estate agent may decide to tip the odds in his favour – and there are numerous ways in which this can be done.

At the listing stage the real estate agent may use improper means to win the listing contract. These include over-quoting on valuation, and offering dodgy sales figures.

During the sale process the real estate agent may be tempted to tell potential purchasers things that are untrue. I have seen many sale contracts with clauses designed to protect real estate agents against the consequences of false statements. Known as “porkies clauses”, they invariably state that the purchaser acknowledges that any information provided to the purchaser by the real estate agent is provided on the understanding that the purchaser will not be relying on it for any purpose.

When a purchaser has submitted an offer, and the purchaser cannot be convinced to increase her offer, the real estate agent may be tempted to pressure the vendor into accepting what would otherwise be unacceptable. Observations, such as “the market has softened” or “the market has spoken to us” are used by real estate agents to convince vendors that the real estate agent’s high estimation of value can no longer be relied upon, and that the vendor should now accept what the vendor believes is an unacceptably low offer.

For some years now, I have been arguing that real estate services should be provided on a fee-for-service basis.

I will explore the replacement of real estate sale commissions with a fee-for-service structure further in future articles.

3 Perspectives on Gaming Licensing – What to Expect From the Gaming Commission

In the world of gaming, there always seems to be this difficult relationship with the casino and its regulator. This is true for both private casinos and those that are Native American owned. Casinos need to hire reliable individuals (ideally those who have passed employee background checks) to keep their business generating revenue, and the gaming commission's job is to make sure those people are legally licensed to work in their respective facilities. Sometimes, the casinos refer in jest to the gaming commission as "cops," and the gaming commission can refer to the casino as "cowboys." Aside from that friendly banter though, this is truly a symbiotic relationship. Both parties need each other, and the fact remains that if the gaming commissions overregulated the casinos, the gaming commissions wouldn't be around themselves.

The Importance of Employee Background Checks & Monitoring

I had a chance to talk with casino employees and casino managers about how the gaming licensing process affects their lives. I also spoke with gaming commissions on how they view their role with respect to regulating. My firm works with a great deal of casino clients that span private industry operators to Native American owned enterprises. One of the major issues that kept coming up was the problem of casino employees not reporting to the gaming commission when they get arrested. This seems to be a recurring problem, but there are many different angles to the issue.

The first perspective that I encountered was from the applicant. Those that I talked to mentioned they knew they should report an arrest but it was very clear to them what a disqualifying offense was or not. The reality of the situation is that most of these offenses are not ones that would have their gaming license taken away, but the applicant does not know that so they simply don't report it, and then run the risk of having it exposed by the gaming commission. And if the gaming commission does an audit and finds an arrest record, that licensee can be terminated. If the applicant came clean and explained the circumstances and situation surrounding the event, he or she could have remained employed.

Another perspective is from the casino. Most casinos run employee background checks on any applicant that they hire, and then, in turn, the gaming commissions will typically also do a thorough investigation that involves an FBI database search. Then, a license is issued if the applicant passes all of the employee background checks. After this is done, casinos will employ the individual and put him or her through extensive training and on-boarding. According to an article published by Robinson and Associates, casino employees are considered to be very valuable asset because they fall under what is called a complex position. A great deal of time, effort, and resources goes into training and nurturing them. When a casino has to replace an employee, this could cost them over $ 10,000 (or over $ 12,000 if they work in an upscale property). What if the gaming commission runs an audit by performing its own employee background checks, finds an employee that recently got arrested (which went unreported), and terminates that employee?

In a time when gambling revenue is down, casinos are watching their bottom line very closely. In many of my discussions, executives have mentioned that if there were some way to have their employees electronically monitored and have the right process to provide the documentation of the arrest occurrence delivered to the gaming commission, it would be a huge help. Casino turnover is already high enough, and if the gaming commission came in and terminated a licensee, that would cost the casino even more money than normal turnover because that employee would have to be removed from the property immediately.

Instituting a System that Monitors Employee Background Checks

The last perspective on performing routine employee background checks is from the gaming commission side, whose responsibility is to keep those casinos in compliance with laws and policies from their respective governments. They are held to those standards and are expected to enforce them. However, every gaming commissioner that I talked to reiterated that the job is not to try and harm the casino's profitability, but to make sure they are kept in compliance and assist them with remaining in compliance. I mentioned the idea of ​​having a system that would instantly alert the employer and then provide a system for the applicant to report his or her arrest to the gaming commission. Although they cannot "officially" comment on any particular service, they did mention that it sounded like an excellent idea. Most commissioners say they consider themselves partners for the casinos and operate as such.

In closing, managing the dynamics of the casino, the gaming commission, and the employee can be challenging, but all parties working together can bring about a consistent solution. I have had the good fortune of being able to work with all parties on solutions for their relationship and get to hear about great ideas all the time. A system for instantly delivering arrest results and setting up a process for self-reporting sounds like a win-win-win. But this is just one of many different ways to approach managing all those involved on the different issues that they intersect on, including employee background checks. Great things come about by working together … and not in conflict.